essencia aromatherapy

A selection of natural, aromatic blends made from the purest essential oils, for you and your baby!

 

essencia aromatherapy’ offers you a selection of natural aromatherapy products specifically blended to enhance your pregnancy and labour and to help you during the postnatal period as a new parent.

We use only pure, natural essential oil blends, and where possible, use organic oils so you know that you are buying the best and the highest quality products for you and your baby. The use of aromatherapy while pregnant can help you remain calm and confident during labour - helping you achieve the birth you want! Brain train your olfactory senses!

If you would like to read more about the uses and benefits of aromatherapy, click here

 

...natural ingredients...organic...IRISH...recyclable...

made to order...qualified aromatherapist... 


Love+Labour & Sweet Dreams
19.99
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Love+Labour & Perineal Massage
17.99
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Love+Labour & Soothing Baby Twin Pack
19.99
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 *** New Products! ***

We now have 10ml bottles of Lavender & Clary Sage available to you. Order now and have them delivered to your door.

 
Love + Labour Blend
11.99
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Sweet Dreams Blend
9.99
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Perineal Massage Blend
7.99
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Soothe + Calm Burner Blend
14.99
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Soothing Baby Blend
9.99
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Clary Sage
from 11.99
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Lavender
7.99
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Use this chart to see how to use each of the essencia products. If you have any questions please email us with your query.

use chart

 

NOTICE

“All information provided on this site, over the phone, via email and on our product labels relating to the use of our products is intended as guidance only. If you are in any doubt about the use of any products please discuss your personal needs in face-to-face consultation with a professional in your area before using the products. We aim to give you as much information and guidance as possible however none of the information we provide should be considered specific to your personal circumstances and all information provided should be considered as general guidance. Specific advice can only be given to you during a face-to-face consultation”.  

 

** Download the essencia Aromatherapy Care Leaflet (pdf) **

 

Benefits of Aromatherapy in Labour

 
the use of pethidine in the study center declined from 6% to 0.2% of women

An Investigation into the Use of Aromatherapy in Intrapartum Midwifery Practice

Published in Volume: 6 Issue 2: September 24, 2007

To cite this article:
Ethel E. Burns, Caroline Blamey, Steven J. Ersser, Lin Barnetson, and Andrew J. Lloyd. The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine. April 2000, 6(2): 141-147. doi:10.1089/acm.2000.6.141.

 

Author information

Ethel E. Burns, P.G.Dip., D.P.S.M., R.M.

Oxford Centre for Health Care Research and Development Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, United Kingdom.

Caroline Blamey, M.I.S.P.A., R.M.

Oxford Radcliffe National Health Service Hospital Trust, Oxford, United Kingdom.

Steven J. Ersser, Ph.D. (Lond.), R.G.N.

School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Southampton, Southampton, United Kingdom.

Lin Barnetson, M.A.

University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.

Andrew J. Lloyd, D.Phil. (York)

Oxford Centre for Health Care Research and Development Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, United Kingdom.

Abstract

Objective: The principal aim of the study was to examine the contribution of aromatherapy to the promotion of maternal comfort during labor and as a tool to improve the quality of midwifery care.

Design: Evaluative study.

Setting: Delivery suite in a large British teaching hospital with approximately 6,500 deliveries per annum.

Subjects: A total of 8,058 mothers were evaluated between 1990 and 1998.

Interventions: Women were offered aromatherapy to relieve anxiety, pain, nausea and/or vomiting or to strengthen contractions. Routine data collected on the use of aromatherapy over the period were analyzed. Data from the unit audit were used to provide a comparison group of mothers not given aromatherapy (n = 15,799) from the study center.

Outcome measures: Outcome measures include mothers' ratings of effectiveness, outcomes of labor, use of pharmacologic pain relief, uptake of intravenous oxytocin, reported associated symptoms, and annual costs.

Results: The use of aromatherapy during childbirth was an increasingly popular care option with mothers and midwives. More than 50% of mothers rated it as helpful, and only 14% found it unhelpful. The use of aromatherapy was not confined to low-risk mothers. Sixty percent of the sample were primigravidae, and 32% overall had had their labor induced. The administration of aromatherapy in childbirth did appear to reduce the need for additional pain relief in a proportion of mothers. More than 8% of primigravidae and 18% of multigravidae used no conventional pain relief during labor after using essential oils. During the years of the study, the use of pethidine in the study center declined from 6% to 0.2% of women. The study also showed that aromatherapy may have the potential to augment labor contractions for women in dysfunctional labour. A very low number of associated adverse symptoms were reported (1%).

Conclusion: This study represents a successful example of the integration of a complementary therapy into mainstream midwifery practice and forms a basis for future research.

The full report of this study is available here, from Liebert Publishers